Carl Rustung

Posts

Character Jam à la Barry

Was trying to pull off one of Lynda Barry’s class exercises on my own, but it was tricky. Spent an evening hacking together a substitute for friends so I could do a solo “Character Jam”.

Newton’s Cradle

Hopping back and forth between digital illustration and hand drawing to get through a complicated drawing. (Spherical reflections are hard.)

Inking practice

Busted out a pad of transparent paper to get a feel for the “old-school ways” of making comics and non-digital inking.

Timed drawings

Just started on a 15-week (15 years, with my tempo) program of creative exercises, taken from a book about cartooning. They range from spontaneous drawing to multi-page comic spreads. This week, I’ve been using a timer.

Sehesteds plass

Tried my hand at some lunch break “urban sketching” outside the office. (Didn’t anticipate the big, blue, delivery truck stopping right in my face.)

Books

What It Is

Book cover for What It Is
Written byLynda Barry
Publish date2007
PublisherDrawn & Quarterly
ISBN9781897299357

Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice

Book cover for Cartooning: Philosophy and Practice
Written byIvan Brunetti
Publish date2010
PublisherYale University Press
ISBN9780300170993
1 quote

Brunetti on photocopying

Making photocopies of our originals is quite instructional, because we get a clue as to how our work will look when reproduced and how to “size” our artwork by considering the final reproduction as we create our original. We may need to adjust and clarify our drawing if our lines do not reproduce as intended.

Avoid frills or unnecessary elaborate flourishes; simplify your range of gray tones. As Art Spiegelman wrote in Dead Dick, his Dick Tracy homage, “Never stipple when you can hatch. Better yet, use black.”

Syllabus

Book cover for Syllabus
Written byLynda Barry
Publish date2013
PublisherDrawn & Quarterly
ISBN9781770461611

Quotes

Panter on finesse

[...] drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.

Glaser on drawing

Thought changes our life and our behavior. I also believe that drawing works in the same way. I am a great advocate of drawing, not in order to become an illustrator, but because I believe drawing changes the brain in the same way as the search to create the right note changes the brain of a violinist. Drawing also makes you attentive. It makes you pay attention to what you are looking at, which is not so easy.

Ordinary superpower

Draw ten five minute cats. Use a timer. Don’t stop. In less than an hour you will get to know some cat that starts showing up under your brush. No by willful effort, but by some sort of being together over a period of time. A drawing of a cat can be that, a being together with the image you make of the cat and then five minutes later you can draw the same cat to see what it is up to. Maybe it’s in the same position, maybe it has gone to sleep. But I like to imagine this place where the cat is being itself and I can somehow pull up pictures from that place onto the paper. It becomes a kind of conjuring. And ordinary superpower.

Time disappears

The best part of working on this series is how time disappears. I don’t know where it is I go when I’m using the brush, but at some point I come back and there is a little painting.

Mort Drucker’s chicken fat

...Drucker’s art partakes in the most venerable MAD tradition of all: the “chicken fat” aesthetic, the stuffing of panels with sight gags and visual digressions pioneered by Harvey Kurtzman and Will Elder (and defined by Elder as the inessential “parts of the strip that gave it more flavor,” as chicken fat gave more flavor to his mother’s soup, “but did very little to advance the storyline”).

Quotes

There is a little painting

Lynda’s experimenting with painting the same picture a dozen times in a row.

The best part of working on this series is how time disappears. I don’t know where it is I go when I’m using the brush, but at some point I come back and there is a little painting.