Carl Rustung

Mostly bookmarks about historical oddities.

Posts

Rubylith and Zipatone

Daniel Clowes’ “Glossary of obsolete commercial art production techniques” from Fantagraphics’ latest artist edition.

Bookmarks

Quotes

The Men who Fooled Hitler

Blass and his brothers in arms were recruited from art schools and ad agencies. They were sought for their acting skills. They were selected for their creativity. They were soldiers whose most effective weapon was artistry.

Because their job was to fool Hitler.

Remaking remakes of remakes

“Repetition” names the condition of our culture, endlessly remaking remakes of remakes. Whereas the fifties, the sixties, the seventies, and the eighties all had distinctive by-the-decade styles in design, clothing, music, and art, from the nineties to now feels like one big remix.

Molten rock rivers

From 1913 until the 1960s, residents of West Mifflin, Pennsylvania, parked their cars along an embankment to watch trains pulling enormous cars with massive cauldrons full of molten rock. In some cases dozens of cauldrons were emptied at once, pouring their molten rock down the side of the hill in eerily beautiful rivers. Observers said they looked like symmetrical rivers of fire and lit the sky red.

Quotes

Haunted Victorians

Interesting how the Victorian style has become synonymous with “haunted house”:

After World War I, America turned its back on Victorian design even more vehemently. Returning soldiers saw death in the once uplifting factories and bright dreams of their Victorian fathers, and began to portray Victorian houses as ghostly remnants of a corrupt past.

[...]

In the 1920s, writes Burns, Victorian structures became a kind of shorthand for fear as artists began incorporating them in literature and theater. Murder mysteries were set in empty Victorians—and as more and more were torn down in real life to make room for modernity, they took root in the imagination instead.